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The PupJoy Post

Help! My Dog Is Killing My Grass

Urine burns killing your lawn? You're not alone.

It’s so easy to just open the door and let your pup do his business, but it may come at the cost of ruining your lawn.

These burn spots appear because the urine eventually kills the grass in your yard. This phenomenon occurs more often in homes with large female dogs.

 

Help! My Dog Is Killing My GrassFido was here

 

Many folks believe this is caused by the urine’s acidic nature. They add baking soda, tomato juice or vitamin C to their dog’s diet to counteract the acid.

These methods may work at times, but in general they're ineffective. Additives like these just make your girl thirstier and lead to increased water consumption – at the end of the day all you've done is dilute her urine.

The real culprit is nitrogen.

Dogs are carnivores and live on a diet of mostly protein. When the proteins are digested, they are excreted as nitrogen in the urine.

The overload in nitrogen is effectively what kills your lawn; the same burn will occur if you overload a certain spot of grass with fertilizer.

These spots can become exacerbated due to many factors. For example, female dogs tend to urinate squatting in one position, which creates larger grass burns.

Larger dogs also expel more urine, creating larger burns.

Even your type of grass makes a difference; bluegrass and Bermuda grass are more sensitive to nitrogen than other types.

Here’s what you can do to help mitigate the problem.

Increase your pup’s water consumption to help dilute her urine, thus diluting the nitrogen. (You can skip the part where you add all that other stuff.)

Try reducing or eliminating lawn fertilizer all together, and water your lawn daily.

If that doesn’t help, transition your pup to a higher quality diet. The protein in all-natural food is more digestible, thus creating fewer waste products.

Having a four-legged family member is a lovely, neverending tangle of sweetness, play, and weird little problems you never thought you'd have to solve.

And we wouldn't trade it for all the green grass in America.

But green grass would still be nice.