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The PupJoy Post

HOT DOGGIES - Heat Stress Warning Signs & Prevention

 

Summer is in full swing - Help your Canine Companion Beat the Heat

Down here in Texas the sun is shining, the air is electric with summer energy, the Texas sky fills with the most glorious sunrises and sunsets and your best friend wants to go out and play the day away!

Unfortunately, your best buddy doesn't understand that the temperature is already in the 90's and rising, and will soon be in the 100's. That leaves you in charge of safeguarding your best friend's health in the summer heat.

Dr Brady J Bennett, from Spicewood Vets near Austin Texas, has years of experience treating serious conditions and offering regular pet wellness care and knows the perils a pooch can face from the heat.

Dogs cool themselves through mainly the surface of their tongues via panting as well as via the pads of their feed, he explains, "They are not efficient in cooling themselves and should not exert themselves for as long as we do without some sort of cooling help, they should not be exerting themselves in temperatures at which we might."

Without a cool assist, a dog can begin to experience heat stress. Dr Bennet urges canine guardians to know the symptoms of heat stress and how to treat them.

 

Symptoms Of Heat Stress

The initial signs of heat stress include heavy panting and mouth that is more open than normal, almost as if the dog has a big grin. The dogs tongue protrudes much father out of his mouth than usual, and end of it has a bell-like shape.

If you notice these symptoms, get your pal indoors as soon as possible, and offer them some water. You can also drench the dog in cool water, cover him in wet towels, or get him to lay down on a cool surface.

The symptoms become undeniable when the dogs gums become bright pink, and her protruding, bell shaped tongue develops a rippled edges.

If your dog's symptoms have reached this stage, take the same actions described for the initial symptoms, and then also place an ice pack to your best friend's belly to provide additional cooling to protect vital organs.

"With a bit of precaution and common sense on your part, your best friend won't experience even the initial symptoms of heat stress" says Dr Bennet.

As heat stress progresses, the dogs heart rate elevates, His gums become pale, and he has difficulty breathing. At this stage the dog needs immediate veterinary care along with the cooling measures previously explained. Ice packs on your best buddies head and belly help protect his brain and vital organs.

Heat stress is most severe When the dog experiences vomiting, diarrhea or both, and has very labored breathing. At this point, the dog may even suffer convulsions and be on the verge of collapsing.

Sadly, a dog suffering from heat stress this severe may be near the point of no return. Nevertheless, cooling measures and care at an emergency clinic may give the dog a fighting chance.

 

How To Beat The Heat (Stress)

With a bit of precaution and common sense on your part, your best friend won't experience even the initial symptoms of heat stress.

"The First thing is to choose cooler times of the day to be out", urges Dr Bennett. Even if the temperature feels right for you it may not be for your friend. "Dogs are closer to the ground's reflected heat, and man-made services can be very hot!" This can result in burnt paws and diminished ability to cool themselves. In fact, in Texas, the is so extreme that the sidewalks can start to melt, imagine how that could affect your dogs feet! Burning the soles of his feet is no fun, so be careful on those pavements and board-walks. Or buy him booties!

Dr Bennett also suggests using a cooling vest or simply putting a wet T-shirt on your four-legged pal. Another option is to get him all wet before heading outside. The cooling vest or wet t-shirt should be your companions only attire. No backpacks, doggie couture, etc. he advises, unless it is a wet item.

Continuing on this damp note, Bennett recommends playing in or near water that your dog can enter., and of course, always have water and a drinking bowl with you.

Your faithful friend may also welcome cold snacks. Make Pup-sicles by stuffing a fillable chew toy with canned dog food, yogurt or pumpkin purée and freeze it! Alternatively, fill and freeze an ice cube tray with bone broth.

For some dogs you may have to scale back outdoor exercise when it's hot. Pups younger and 17 weeks and seniors shouldn't be outside long, because their bodies simply can't deal with excess heat. Toy breeds and dogs with short legs are also at a higher risk for heatstroke, along with brachycephalic dogs with shorts noses and flat faces.

Does your best pal need lots of exercise to welcome all his energy? "Take a class with a reputable training facility on how to work your dog mentally to cut down on the need for physical exertion"

Even better still, head for the cool sea breezes or the mountains where you dog can run and jump to his heart's content. So many Hotels are now dog friendly and welcome dogs, offering fantastic pet amenities so you and your little buddy can have loads of summer fun. So, if you want to have fun in the summer head for somewhere cooler! Your dog will thank you.

Finally, it goes without saying that you should NEVER leave you dog in the car alone. Even with the windows cracked open. Heat stress comes on very quickly and a dog can get distressed and in extreme cases could die. Leave your dog at home or in his nice cooled air-conditioned Hotel room!

By following these recommendations and using good sense, you and your canine companion can be totally chill all summer long!